Warlike Parakeet

Trying to make sense of this world and the nature of my soul. I think visually, so I figured this blog will help.

ageofdestruction:

alanis: Clouds and shadows on Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 24th May 2012.

Between 28 and 36°S, 284°E, on the arc of highlands that surround the southeast Solis Planum. The crater split between the 2nd and 3rd images is Voeykov, about 75 km across, named for climatologist and geographer Alexander Ivanovich Voeykov (1842-1916). The small, deep crater toward bottom left of the 4th image is Los, named for a village of about 400 people in Gävleborg County, Sweden.

Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and 5 monochrome images for animation. Colour is not balanced naturalistically, and the slightly psychedelic colours of the clouds are a result of mismatches between the images where the clouds have moved between exposures.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

(via priceofliberty)

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
More than 5000 people have died in the Central African Republic (CAR) in the last 9 months, according to the AP’s tally. The AP admits this is probably only a portion of the real number.
About 1500 more UN troops will head to CAR next week.
CAR is the crisis that never makes headlines.
Libya has accused Sudan of sending weapons to Islamists in Tripoli and expelled the Sudanese military attache.
The UN helicopter that crashed in South Sudan last month was shot down.
Peacekeepers in Somalia used their hospital connections to target vulnerable women and girls for sexual assault and rape.
With the killing of Al-Shabab leader Ahmed Abdi Godane has been confirmed, the group chose a new leader — Ahmad Umar.
Drone footage surveys the extent of damage in Gaza. 
Israel has ordered investigation into five incidents during the latest Gaza war, including the deaths of the four boys playing soccer on the beach.
CrisisGroup analyzes the importance of Aleppo in the Syrian civil war.
The largest Syrian rebel group, Ahrar al-Sham, lost nearly all of its leadership in an unexplained explosion.
BuzzFeed profiles a smuggler who has brought thousands of foreign fighters into Syria. 
The Nusra Front, an al-Qaeda linked Syrian group, has released 45 peacekeepers.
Yemen is pursuing talks with the Houthi rebels.
A transcript of President Obama’s remarks on ISIS and strategy from Wednesday.
And… Obama, airstrikes and that tricky War Powers Act.
The Pentagon is authorized to proceed with leadership targeting as a tactic against ISIS, with Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi at the top of the hit list. 
Partnerships against ISIS bring their own complications.
Kurdish Peshmerga forces make advances against ISIS with the help of US airstrikes.
The Washington Post keeps a running tally of US strikes against ISIS.
Looking at the legal rationale offered up by the administration for conducting strikes in Syria.
A more in-depth look at what was on the ISIS laptop obtained by journalists. 
ISIS may have taken anti-tank weapons from Syrian rebels.
Tim Arango, the Baghdad Bureau Chief for the New York Times did a Reddit AMA.
In the thirteen years (this week) since the 9/11 attacks, how has al-Qaeda changed? It has been weakened but it hasn’t been defeated.
The Iraqi parliament approved a new government headed by Haider al-Abadi.
Qatar confirms the detention of two British men researching migrant labor issues.
Afghanistan’s election results are likely coming next week. 
Presidential candidate Abdullah Abdullah has already said he will not accept the official results. 
Pakistan is digging a trench along the border with Afghanistan.
Imran Khan marks a month of protests — demonstrations which have wearied Pakistan’s capital city.
Luhansk counts its dead.
Russia still has 1000 troops in Ukraine and 20,000 at the border.
The EU tightens Russia sanctions.
Mexican journalist Karla Silva was savagely beaten for her critical reporting.
Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) says the declassified CIA torture report might not be released until November.
We already know, though, that CIA waterboarding of top terrorism suspects involved “holding them underwater until the point of death.”
Zelda, the Dear Abby of the NSA.
In 2008, Yahoo! ended its legal battle against complying with the PRISM program because the government threatened a $250,000/day non-compliance fine. 
An appeals court ruled that Jose Padilla’s 17-year sentence was too lenient and revised it to 21 years.
Crowdsourcing a catalogue of all the guns of World War One. 
Photo: Bambari, Central African Republic. June 2014. A Moroccan peacekeeper with the UN’s MINUSCA peacekeeping force on patrol. Catianne Tijerina/UN.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

Photo: Bambari, Central African Republic. June 2014. A Moroccan peacekeeper with the UN’s MINUSCA peacekeeping force on patrol. Catianne Tijerina/UN.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.
The United Nations took over the peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic, previously led by the African Union. 
Amnesty International has uncovered the extensive and horrifying torture practices of Nigerian security forces. 
5 UN peacekeepers were killed by a roadside bomb in Mali.
Egypt and Russia signed a preliminary arms deal worth $3.5 billion.
Egyptian activist Alaa Abd El Fattah has been released on bail.
Fighter jets from an unknown country carried out four airstrikes against militants near Libya’s capital.
ISIS released its third beheading video - this time of British aid worker David Haines, an RAF veteran working for the aid group Nonviolent Peaceforce. Here’s a brief profile of his life and work. The video then threatened the life of another captive Briton, a taxi driver named Alan Henning who was taken captive on his second aid convoy trip to Syria. 
Congress authorized arming and training the (non-ISIS) Syrian rebels.
President Obama and American military leadership show a split on ISIS strategy.
The three beheadings have drawn into debate the zero-concession policies of the US and UK. James Foley’s family have been deeply critical of the US government’s handling of their son’s case and treatment of the families of ISIS kidnapping victims. 
A second ISIS propaganda video featured another captive, British photojournalist John Cantlie in a mock newscast setting, wearing a prison-style jumpsuit and saying there will be more “programs” to follow.
The AFP will no longer accept work from freelance journalists in Syria.
France has ditched reference to the Islamic State or ISIS, instead opting for “Daesh,” as the extremist group is often referred to by Arabic speakers. 
Australia claims to have thwarted an ISIS attack on their soil. 
Christian Caryl comments on the incredible and underestimated power of collective rage in driving violent acts like those committed by ISIS.
"Al Qaeda denies decline, acknowledges ‘mistakes’ by its branches.”
A series of Friday car bombings in Baghdad have killed at least 17 people. Baghdad’s Thursday death toll was at least 45.
A new booming business in Baghdad defending people charged with terrorism offenses. 
Matthieu Aikins embeds with Syria’s first responders. 
43 veteran members of the clandestine Israeli military intelligence Unit 8200 are refusing to participate in reserve duty on moral grounds, based on the country’s treatment of Palestinians.
A deal has been reached between Israel and Palestine over reconstruction work in Gaza.
Serious fighting is ongoing in Yemen after weeks of continued unrest between Houthi rebels and Sunni militias. The Houthi have pushed into the capital city Sana’a and besieged a university known for Sunni radicalism.
Sharif Mobley, an American imprisoned in Yemen who has been missing inside the system for seven months, managed a phone call to his wife in which he alleged torture and said he feared for his life.
Politico goes deep inside the US’ first armed drone mission, in October of 2001, and the failed attempt to take out Mullah Omar.
Talks have stalled yet again between the sparring Afghan presidential candidates.
Palwasha Tokhi is the seventh Afghan journalist to be killed this year.
Muhammad Shakil Auj, the dean of Islamic Studies at the University of Karachi, was shot dead on his way to a reception at the Iranian Consulate.
A South Asian wing of Al Qaeda has claimed responsibility for hijacking a Pakistani naval ship and attempting to use it to attack US ships.
BBC journalists were attacked and had their equipment smashed while investigating the death of a Russian soldier. 
Popular Ukrainian football team Shakhtar Donetsk has been forced to relocate, along with other eastern teams, to Kiev for its matches because of fighting.
Ukrainian rebels says that new self-rule laws are not enough.
An intense border dispute at the India-China border in the Himalayas occurred while the two nation’s leaders met for a summit.
The CIA released a set of newly-declassified articles from its in-house journal, Studies in Intelligence. 
The White House has said it sees legal justification for strikes against ISIS in both the 2001 authorization to fight Al Qaeda and the 2002 authorization of the Iraq War.
Photo: Zummar, Iraq. A Kurdish Peshmerga fighter launches mortar shells toward ISIS-controlled territory. Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters.

thepoliticalnotebook:

This Week in War. A Friday round-up of what happened and what’s been written in the world of war and military/security affairs this week. It’s a mix of news reports, policy briefs, blog posts and longform journalism.

  • The United Nations took over the peacekeeping mission in the Central African Republic, previously led by the African Union. 
  • Amnesty International has uncovered the extensive and horrifying torture practices of Nigerian security forces. 
  • 5 UN peacekeepers were killed by a roadside bomb in Mali.
  • Egypt and Russia signed a preliminary arms deal worth $3.5 billion.
  • Egyptian activist Alaa Abd El Fattah has been released on bail.
  • Fighter jets from an unknown country carried out four airstrikes against militants near Libya’s capital.
  • ISIS released its third beheading video - this time of British aid worker David Haines, an RAF veteran working for the aid group Nonviolent Peaceforce. Here’s a brief profile of his life and work. The video then threatened the life of another captive Briton, a taxi driver named Alan Henning who was taken captive on his second aid convoy trip to Syria. 
  • Congress authorized arming and training the (non-ISIS) Syrian rebels.
  • President Obama and American military leadership show a split on ISIS strategy.
  • The three beheadings have drawn into debate the zero-concession policies of the US and UK. James Foley’s family have been deeply critical of the US government’s handling of their son’s case and treatment of the families of ISIS kidnapping victims. 
  • A second ISIS propaganda video featured another captive, British photojournalist John Cantlie in a mock newscast setting, wearing a prison-style jumpsuit and saying there will be more “programs” to follow.
  • The AFP will no longer accept work from freelance journalists in Syria.
  • France has ditched reference to the Islamic State or ISIS, instead opting for “Daesh,” as the extremist group is often referred to by Arabic speakers. 
  • Australia claims to have thwarted an ISIS attack on their soil. 
  • Christian Caryl comments on the incredible and underestimated power of collective rage in driving violent acts like those committed by ISIS.
  • "Al Qaeda denies decline, acknowledges ‘mistakes’ by its branches.”
  • A series of Friday car bombings in Baghdad have killed at least 17 people. Baghdad’s Thursday death toll was at least 45.
  • A new booming business in Baghdad defending people charged with terrorism offenses. 
  • Matthieu Aikins embeds with Syria’s first responders. 
  • 43 veteran members of the clandestine Israeli military intelligence Unit 8200 are refusing to participate in reserve duty on moral grounds, based on the country’s treatment of Palestinians.
  • A deal has been reached between Israel and Palestine over reconstruction work in Gaza.
  • Serious fighting is ongoing in Yemen after weeks of continued unrest between Houthi rebels and Sunni militias. The Houthi have pushed into the capital city Sana’a and besieged a university known for Sunni radicalism.
  • Sharif Mobley, an American imprisoned in Yemen who has been missing inside the system for seven months, managed a phone call to his wife in which he alleged torture and said he feared for his life.
  • Politico goes deep inside the US’ first armed drone mission, in October of 2001, and the failed attempt to take out Mullah Omar.
  • Talks have stalled yet again between the sparring Afghan presidential candidates.
  • Palwasha Tokhi is the seventh Afghan journalist to be killed this year.
  • Muhammad Shakil Auj, the dean of Islamic Studies at the University of Karachi, was shot dead on his way to a reception at the Iranian Consulate.
  • A South Asian wing of Al Qaeda has claimed responsibility for hijacking a Pakistani naval ship and attempting to use it to attack US ships.
  • BBC journalists were attacked and had their equipment smashed while investigating the death of a Russian soldier. 
  • Popular Ukrainian football team Shakhtar Donetsk has been forced to relocate, along with other eastern teams, to Kiev for its matches because of fighting.
  • Ukrainian rebels says that new self-rule laws are not enough.
  • An intense border dispute at the India-China border in the Himalayas occurred while the two nation’s leaders met for a summit.
  • The CIA released a set of newly-declassified articles from its in-house journal, Studies in Intelligence. 
  • The White House has said it sees legal justification for strikes against ISIS in both the 2001 authorization to fight Al Qaeda and the 2002 authorization of the Iraq War.

Photo: Zummar, Iraq. A Kurdish Peshmerga fighter launches mortar shells toward ISIS-controlled territory. Ahmed Jadallah/Reuters.

Man Calls Cops To Report Vandals At His Home, They Show Up And Kill Him

c4ss:

47-year-old Daniel Martin Jr. of Lawton Oklahoma was shot and killed by police in March after he called 911 to report vandals outside of his house.

The police responsible for the murder have been cleared of any wrong-doing by an internal investigation, and the death has been ruled “justified”.

When Mr. Martin spoke with the 911 dispatcher he warned them that he had a gun, and that he would be carrying it just in case the vandals were to break into his home.

However, somewhere this message got lost in translation, because when Martin opened his front door for the police, someone shouted “gun,” and Lawton police officers Elijah Garcia and Anthony Edwards fired multiple rounds, News Oklahoma reported.

Recordings later obtained of the exchange between the dispatcher and the police show that the police were warned that the victim would have a gun. …

(via priceofliberty)

andrewdshixon:

This is the threat. British nationalism. Not Scottish nationalism. In the city that voted Yes. Back to this kind of Glasgow. Nazi salutes and chants about the famine. 

(via socialistexan)

An Urgent Call for the Protection and Preservation of Tibetan Language

genqueue:

The full translation of the article by Khenpo Tsultrim Lodoe can be found here. The author concludes

As a consequence of all the conditions and constraints presented, Tibetan language is becoming unusable in Tibet, and it is of prime importance for everybody to realise that it is declining at an unprecedented pace. Therefore, I urgently call for a collective campaign inspired and awakened by a shared consciousness and concern to revitalise, protect and preserve Tibetan language.

(Source: globalvoices)